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2.2 Independent Living Service

AMENDMENT

This chapter was substantially updated in April 2015 and should be re-read in its entirety.


Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Occupational Therapy
  3. Sensory Service


1. Introduction

The Independent Living Service comprises of Occupational Therapy and Sensory teams Our aim is to maximise choice, Independence and control for people using this service.


2. Occupational Therapy

Our Occupational Therapists and support staff carry out person centered assessments with adults, who due to their physical impairment and illness are having difficulties carrying out activities of daily living. We assist adults and their carers to enable them to determine their own outcomes for the future and to live as independently as possible. Following assessment we provide equipment and adaptations for people whose disability has a significant impact on their wellbeing or ability to carry out activities of daily living.


3. Sensory Service

The sensory team carry out person centred assessments with adults, who due to their sight and hearing impairment are having difficulties with activities of daily living and communication. We assist adults and their carers to enable them to determine their own outcomes for the future and to live as independently as possible. We provide advice, equipment and adaptations for people whose sensory disability has a significant impact on their wellbeing, communication or ability to carry out activities of daily living.

Sight Loss

Adult Social Care are responsible for holding the register of eligible Brighton & Hove residents who are severely sight impaired/ sight impaired. The certificate for visual Impairment (CVI) is determined by a Consultant Ophthalmologist from the Health Authority.

The Rehabilitation Officers for Visual Impairment (ROVI) can provide equipment, adaptations and rehabilitation to help people access the community and their homes safely.

The ROVI’s can offer advice on ways people with visual loss may find it easier to use the telephone, write letters, sign forms and how to organise household tasks. They can also advise on improving communication.

Low Vision Clinic

Adult social care provides a low vision service on behalf of the clinical commissioning group. The low vision clinic (LVC) is run by rehabilitation officers for visual impairment (ROVI) who have specific training as low vision therapists. The low vision assessment checks the level of functional vision. Optical magnifiers can be issued, where appropriate, to enable a range of visual tasks. Low vision therapy techniques can also be taught to maximize the benefits and use of magnifiers issued. Information and advice is also given.

Eligibility for Low Vision Service - This service is provided for the Health Authority, Social Care eligibility does not apply.

Referral process To attend the low vision clinic people need to be referred by their optician or eye hospital. Eye hospital patients will still need to see an optician for a prescription and examination. This is so that we are confident a clinical examination has recently been undertaken and you have an up to date optician’s prescription and diagnosis.

Hearing Loss

A specialist worker can provide assessment, equipment and adaptations to assist communication and improve safety within the home. Examples of equipment that can be provided for eligible needs include flashing doorbells, headphones to hear the television, vibrating smoke alerts, telephone adaptations.

Dual Sight and Hearing Loss

A severe impairment in both your sight and hearing may mean you have additional problems with communication, mobility and access to information.

We will ensure that a worker with specialist knowledge is involved in the assessment of adults who are deafblind. We will assess the affects of visual and hearing loss together.

End